Echoes of Eden | 11.14.16

Have you ever had the sense of something so much bigger than yourself, maybe catching a glimpse of something so beautiful, something strange or exciting, and yet peaceful? Like, that overwhelming feeling of awe at the birth of your child, or the lump that comes into your throat at a poignant moment in a movie; a piece of music that taps into something deep inside, a warm sense of “rightness” when you give of yourself sacrificially, or that sense of deep mystery and beauty watching a sunset over the ocean. NT Wright describes this as “echoes of a voice that points beyond itself.”

So what are these echoes pointing to?

For years, I didn’t really get how the Bible stories from centuries ago had anything to do with my life now, or what the long litany of the people of Israel had to do with Jesus. But, slowly I’ve begun to understand that the Bible is telling an on-going epic story that isn’t over yet – a drama that we are now experiencing. This story is full of adventure, romance, danger, and betrayal, with a hero/lover and a evil villain. Ecclesiastes 3:11 tells us that we have eternity written in our hearts, planted there by God – a Story (with a capital “S”) that we just can’t escape; somehow we just know there has to be more to our existence.

The Bible stories of the people of Israel are not just random stories, but are pieces of the saga that tell of God’s long-term plan to rescue and redeem the hearts of people and restore things back to the way they were meant to be – before evil entered the Story. The circumstances of your life are not just random events, but are interactive scenes in which you have an important role to play – one full of adventure, intrigue, sacrifice, danger, love, regret, and hope.

I believe the echoes are whispers from the One who loves us and will do whatever it takes to win our hearts back to Him. The voice is calling to us of a world set right again, a foretaste of what living life with God at the center will be like, pointing to the ending of the Story – which has already been written. Like all great stories, the villain is disposed of, the hero rescues the heroine, and they all live happily ever after – the kind of ending our hearts long for.

“There is far more going on around us than meets the eye. We live in a world with two halves, one part that we can see and another part that we cannot. We must live as though the unseen world (the rest of reality) is more weighty and more real and more dangerous than the part of reality we can see.” ~John Eldredge, Epic

How would you live differently if you believed this Story to be true?

Not About Me | 9.12.16

 

Following Jesus as his apprentice means that you have entered into a lifelong process of conforming to the image of Christ for the sake of others, I am thinking today about that last phrase – for the sake of others.  For some reason, recently this has jumped out at me, like I’ve never noticed it before.

In Christian circles, we hear a lot about a personal relationship with God. True, we do have that, but somewhere along the way, I wonder if we have come to believe that our spiritual life is a private thing just between God and us, and is somehow separate from our real life? Sometimes I think we view relationships with others as secondary and only tangential to our primary relationship with God. It’s almost like we believe that all we have to do is learn Bible stuff, clean ourselves up a bit, and do the right kinds of religious activities.

What if it turns out that my relationship with God isn’t just all about me? The truth is that the process of being conformed to the image of Christ actually takes place right in the middle of the daily messy stuff of our relationships with others, not apart from them. Those frustrating people and circumstances are actually the intersection at which the Holy Spirit transforms us, where we become more like Jesus, more conformed to His image.

Our Lord’s teaching was always anti-self-realization. His purpose is not the development of a person – His purpose is to make a person exactly like Himself, and the Son of God is characterized by self-expenditure.

~Oswald Chambers, My Utmost For His Highest

Think for a minute about what Jesus did. He is the One who gave himself totally, completely, unconditionally for others. He hung out with the non-religious types and rather than looking down his nose judgmentally at them, actually seemed to enjoy their company. It makes sense that being conformed to His image will happen as we love, value and serve people the way Jesus did. Not just when we feel great, not just when it’s convenient, not just with people we like, who think like us or make us look or feel good.

Oswald goes on to say: If we believe in Jesus, it is not what we gain but what He pours through us that really counts. God’s purpose is not simply to make us beautiful, plump grapes, but to make us grapes so that he may squeeze the sweetness out of us.

A helpful question might be to ask yourself if you are willing to be conformed to the image of Jesus, primarily for the sake of others? Just imagine what the world would be like if all those who say they follow Jesus were to actually surrender themselves to this purpose.

For Other’s Sake | 11.8.15

In Christian circles, we hear a lot about having a personal relationship with God, which is true – we do have that – but somewhere along the way, I wonder if we have come to believe that our spiritual growth is a private thing just between God and us, and is somehow separate from our “real” life?

Sometimes we tend to view relationships with others as secondary to our primary relationship with God, as if once we’ve become spiritual enough, maybe we can transfer this spirituality to our relationships with others, and “be Christian” to them.

Here’s the simple idea that may help us: What if this process of being conformed to the image of Christ takes place right in the middle of the daily messy stuff of our relationships with others, not apart from them? Every single annoying and frustrating circumstance or person is an opportunity to grow, and is actually the intersection at which the Holy Spirit transforms us, where we become more like Jesus.